I’m Going… On A Vacation!

Well, kind of.

I’ve had an interesting relationship with summer vacation for a ridiculously long time, but one thing has been true for the last several years: I never stick to my blogging schedule during the summer.

I mean, it’s not like I stick to my schedule anyway; my schedule says I post once a week on Monday, Tuesday, or Wednesday (but not usually Wednesday) and I still don’t manage to be super consistent with that. I’ve learned to loosen up a lot and just let it be what it is, and if I don’t post this week, so be it! I’m okay with that.

Anyway, as I sit here in my chair at 9pm trying to decide what to do this evening, I decided to go look at my blog set up, and hey look! I have no scheduled posts, no drafts, and no ideas.

And I’m okay with that.

As of right now, I’m offically giving myself the summer off. If I have something that really merits a blog post, I’ll make one up and schedule it for one of the days in my terribly ambiguous schedule. If not, I’m not going to worry about it.

In other words, see you in August!

But I’ll be on my social media accounts on my usual semi-daily basis and sending my newsletter every month, so I won’t be vanishing entirely. It’s just that I spend so much time outside during the summer and I’m trying to get out of the habit of 6am to 11pm work days, so I think removing this stresser for the summer months will be a huge benefit for my overall sanity. (People tell me it’s questionable at best.)

I plan to spend the summer reading, swimming, gardening, not dying while my family does a plethora of projects, star gazing and mosquito swatting, avoiding moose flies (ask me sometime about being used a moose fly bait when I was nine), writing, and hanging out with a popsicle. I had planned to hike a mountain in July until the weather got to a roasting 72 degrees Fahrenheit last week and I remembered why I like hiking in September: less bugs and less heat. So the hiking trip might be postponed. We’ll see.

See you in August if not before!

-Annie

White-Washed Tombs {cleanliness in writing}

I have people who tell me I shouldn’t have any swearing in my books.
Well…

*whispers* I don’t always agree with that.

I’ll be honest, I’m pretty nervous to share this post with people. I hear it so often from so many different places:

  • Christian fiction shouldn’t have language. 
  • Christian fiction shouldn’t have violence or gore. 
  • Christian fiction shouldn’t have death.
  • Christian fiction shouldn’t have kissing or anything beyond that. 


And the ever baffling ultimatum:

  • Christian fiction should be clean. 

I’m never exactly sure what they mean by “clean” because life isn’t clean. I understand about keeping things appropriate for the age level and not being slimy and trashy even when you’re writing to young adults and adults. But some of these restrictions don’t make sense to me because it’s stuff I run into in the outside world, about once a week. Thank God for messy books like Katherine Paterson and The Bible, that helped prepare me for meeting messy human beings. (And helped me figure out myself, messy human being exhibit A.)

If you’re sitting saying that the Bible isn’t a messy book, I don’t know what parts you’ve been reading, because it sure isn’t pretty.
In Matthew when Jesus is chewing out the Pharisees? (Matthew Chapter 23, go look it up.)
He calls them “white washed tombs” and “brood of vipers”. Now look in the Old Testament at what the cleanliness laws are and consider what those terms actually mean to the elite of the Jewish people. If you actually think about it, he’s cussing them out pretty bad. We just don’t realize that because those words don’t really mean anything to us today. We don’t understand the severity of those terms.


The argument people throw at me most often is “Do it all for the glory of God.” You know, this section of 1st Corinthians 10:

“I have the right to do anything,” you say—but not everything is beneficial. “I have the right to do anything”—but not everything is constructive. No one should seek their own good, but the good of others.Eat anything sold in the meat market without raising questions of conscience, for, “The earth is the Lord’s, and everything in it.”
If an unbeliever invites you to a meal and you want to go, eat whatever is put before you without raising questions of conscience. But if someone says to you, “This has been offered in sacrifice,” then do not eat it, both for the sake of the one who told you and for the sake of conscience. I am referring to the other person’s conscience, not yours. For why is my freedom being judged by another’s conscience? If I take part in the meal with thankfulness, why am I denounced because of something I thank God for?So whether you eat or drink or whatever you do, do it all for the glory of God. Do not cause anyone to stumble, whether Jews, Greeks or the church of God—even as I try to please everyone in every way. For I am not seeking my own good but the good of many, so that they may be saved.


Okay, that’s great! Thanks. Throw a Bible verse at the issue, because that always fixes it.

Here’s the thing:

I write stories. I don’t write for a Christian audience, and I have never claimed to. I don’t write for a secular audience. I write for readers. I write because I believe these are stories that need to be told. Occasionally I write because God says “oh ho ho, my dear, you’re not getting out of it that easily” and leaves Howler notes in my dreams until I get my rear end in my desk chair and write. (I wish I was kidding.)

My stories are populated with people. Some of them have had really horrible things happen to them, and that shapes their character, and sometimes who they are when we meet them at the beginning of the book isn’t pleasant.

I cannot demand they are squeaky church-approved clean.

I can’t! There it is. I cannot demand that the characters in my story be different than they are.

If I demand that my teenage character Theo {The Importance of Blood} doesn’t swear in the first half of his story, I miss out on the way we learn he’s healing. He’s angry, he’s scared, he’s hurting. He acts out and yells, cusses, breaks dishes, throws things, and generally makes a mess of everything.

But then he starts to feel safe.

He starts to feel loved.

He starts to feel wanted.

And when he starts to understand he doesn’t have to fight for his life anymore, he starts to heal.

That is shown in the way his behavior changes. In the way his character develops. He starts actively trying to work on his anger issues. He stops cussing. He stops breaking dishes. And he learns to apologize when he hurts someone. And by the end of the book we’ve found he’s a sensitive kid who had to grow up too fast, who grew a thick skin to keep himself safe. He’s trying so hard to be better than who he was, because he doesn’t like who he was.




I don’t throw swear words around carelessly because that eliminates the purpose of having them in there. The reason to have them in my story is to communicate that something is wrong. Someone is hurting, something bad is happening, THERE IS A PROBLEM HERE. One well placed swear word can be exactly what is needed. I work hard to make sure it’s in the right place. Sometimes I can replace it with ‘Theo swore’ but sometimes that’s a cheap cheat and it shows.
And no, I’m not trying to tell people to put swearing in their books. If it doesn’t have a place, don’t put it in. It’s as simple as that. I’m not writing this to tell other people what to do; I’m writing this to explain why I do things the way I do.


{One of the things I love about blogging is that it’s an interactive medium of sharing my thoughts. One of my new followers sent me a lovely email in response to this post, and hearing her point of view allowed me to find the piece I knew I was missing somewhere, and wrap this up so I’m happier with it. And if any of this is confusing, I’m sorry. My head doesn’t always arrange itself in such a way that it can make sense.}


I’ve spent a lot of time praying about this, thinking about this, and talking it out with a few people. That verse that people throw around, about glorifying God in all I do? I glorify him by doing the job He’s given me, to the best of my ability. Sometimes that means reading a bible passage in church, and sometimes that means cleaning out the septic field. Sometimes that means writing a story that is glowing with His love, and sometimes that means writing a story that’s still trying to find His love. Sometimes that means praying and talking with other Christians, and sometimes that means trudging through a foot of snow to check on a family in need. Sometimes that means taking flowers to an elderly neighbor and sometimes that means putting on my war boots and gloves to jump in and get my hands dirty.

What is the intent? I try really hard to make sure the bad stuff I show in my writing is met and matched by hope and light. There is truth in the bad things. But there is also truth in the good. My intent is not to shock people with foul language. My intent is to use that as a tool to further, deepen, and strengthen the story I’m telling. My goal is that the words I lay before people have been considered, weighed, measured, and found to be needed in their place. I don’t throw these things around casually, my dears. But I know from personal experience that the right book at the right time, dealing with hard things and showing things that aren’t pretty… that can make all the difference in the world. 

Some of the time I read Christian fiction and it leaves me feeling sick to my stomach. It’s so sappy and melodramatic and overly moralistic and oh-so-clean. It completely abolishes the fact that we live in a world where bad stuff happens every day. And then I read books like The Fault in Our Stars, which has some language and some sexual content, and it’s a breath of fresh air because these, these are kids like the ones I knew at high school. These are people I know. I’m not saying that it’s okay or that I agree with everything that is said and done; I’m saying that it’s real. 

The best is when I find books that give me that “I know this character, they’re a person like I could meet on the street” that are written from a point of view that shares the good and the hope as well as the bad and the hurt. Stories that are written to strengthen, challenge, and reassure those who read it. They don’t shy away from the messy parts, but use them as necessary, as a tool to tell the story. 

One of my romance stories doesn’t have any language, any sexual content beyond the couple kissing when they get engaged. It doesn’t need it. It would be horribly inappropriate to include it, not to mention disrespectful to the characters, the story, myself, and my readers. I have a lot of stories like that, actually. But that doesn’t mean the other stories aren’t there too, and it doesn’t mean they don’t need to be written. How can we ever hope to reach the hurting if we act like they don’t exist?

See, life is messy. And I write about that. But life is also really cool, and sometimes we meet other humans and we just *click* and that’s it, we’re family now. And life has rainstorms and thunder and apple blossoms and waterfalls and autumn leaves and holding hands while you walk to the post office. And life has snow storms and crocuses and sunlight pushing through a cloudy day. And life has mud puddles and blood and death and dark, dark earth that sticks to your shoes because it’s so moist and rich. It’s a huge, tangled up, complicated mess of so many things, and I don’t know how to pick and choose which things I talk about.

So yes, sometimes my stories are messy.

-Annie

Copyright 2018 by Annie Louise Twitchell

Spinner of Secrets {first birthday + giveaway}

This upcoming week is pretty incredibly busy for me.

On May 14th, Spinner of Secrets turns one year old.

On May 17th, I’ve been asked to present to three groups of elementary school students about writing as a career.

On May 19th, I’ll be at the Homeschoolers of Maine Used Curriculum Sale with my books, in the vendor expo hall.

To celebrate my book baby’s birthday, I’m hosting a really big giveaway!

I’m giving away one whole collection of my paperbacks!

I’m ALSO giving away one paperback copy of Spinner of Secrets!

For my international loves — how about an e-book copy of Spinner of Secrets? I can’t pay international shipping this time around, but I don’t want you left out. So I’m adding, open worldwide (so yes, this includes US residents) THREE e-book copies of Spinner of Secrets OR a lovely little prize pack that might… possibly… include an art print file…

… that might look like this.

There are five potential winners for this giveaway!!

Here’s the Rafflecopter Dude:

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Good luck!

-Annie

March Madness {a giveaway}

Drum roll, please…

I’m giving away two paperback copies of my book, The Ocean and I. This giveaway runs until March 31st!

March is such an interesting month. It never seems to make up its mind about what it’s doing. We just got knee-deep snow, and I expect by the end of the month, there will be knee-deep puddles. I’m so looking forward to grass and flowers!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

I’ll be back later to share about a book I really loved, so I’ll see you then!

~Annie

The Hobbit {my favorite book}

You’d be surprised how many times I get asked what my favorite book is. It’s on blog tour signups, it’s quizzes in my online groups, it’s just random questions. I usually have a hard time picking a favorite, but not with books. There’s always one I can give as an answer: 
The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien 

The first time I walked into a hole in the ground, I was five. Maybe six. My dad read it aloud to me and my four brothers, and I was hooked for life. 
See, I was a fearful little girl. I wanted to be brave and important and save the world, but I got scared by the shadows in my closet and bright lights and by people talking too loudly around me. 
I learned about being wild from the boys I grew up with. They challenged me to jump off cliffs (literally), to climb trees (I am terrible at it), to run all out and not be scared of tripping and falling (I still have scars on my knees). They encouraged me to take a couple steps and throw myself out, trusting to the water to catch me and cradle me. 
But there were some things they couldn’t do. 
They couldn’t teach me not to be afraid of the darkness. 
They couldn’t teach me about the dragons I would have to face. 
We were only little kids, after all. They didn’t know about those things either.

Later – much later – I learned far too much more about fear. I learned about the monsters that lurked, not under my bed or in my closet, but inside my mind. I learned about grief. I learned about being ripped apart. I learned about being wrong. I learned about being hurt. I learned about death.

I learned all that and more, and I almost lost myself in the middle of it.

By that point, The Hobbit movies were being filmed and everyone in my family was buzzing with excitement. I got out my book from the bottom of the stack on my bedside table – even during the time when I didn’t read it every six months, it never quite made it to the shelves – and I read it again.

I found myself inside the pages. I was Thorin. brave and loyal and proud. Too proud. I was Smaug, my own monster. I was Smeagol, clutching to things I couldn’t keep. Most importantly, I was Bilbo, small and afraid and unimportant.

But I learned something, and the movies helped me see it clearer.

I learned that even the small, seemingly unimportant ones are needed. I learned that sometimes what the world needs is a little more home. Sometimes it needs another pocket handkerchief.

The beauty of The Hobbit is that Bilbo doesn’t try to be Thorin or Gandalf or Beorn. Bilbo is simply himself, and that is enough. He becomes, over the course of the story, a better version of himself… but he is still himself. He is a hobbit. He likes his books and his armchair and clean handkerchiefs. Tea is at four.

Image: Pinterest

I learned more about being from reading or listening to The Hobbit approximately 200 times in the last fifteen years than I ever learned in church or listening to sermons or preachers. I learned more about life, my own and life in general, from this little book than I have from almost anywhere else. I sometimes think this book saved my life. I don’t really know, but I do know that it has shaped me in ways I wouldn’t have thought possible.

I love C. S. Lewis’s quote on stories for children because it sums up my relationship with The Hobbit so well:

Image: Pinterest

So if you ask me what my favorite book is, I might tell you the title of one I just finished… I might protest at having to pick favorites and how difficult the entire concept is… I might rattle off a list that’s three miles long… or I might tell you The Hobbit.

-Annie

Hey friend! I’m so glad you stopped in. Leave a comment below, I’d love to know what book has influenced you the most! If you’d like, you can follow my blog by email, or sign up for my newsletter, or both! I’d love to have you. 



Copyright 2018 by Annie Louise Twitchell

So Sang The Dawn {review}

2/7/2018
um, no review right now, too busy crying, good cry, don’t worry, LOVED the book, it’s beautiful.





2/10/2018
OKAY. deep breath. 

So I’m procrastinating on an article by writing this, but at least I’m writing, right? Yeah, anyway. 

I don’t know that I’ve read a book like this in a while. This one really needs like seven out of five stars. The last time I remember reading a book in such pell-mell haste and reaching the end and just—hanging—was when I read Moonraker’s Bride for the first time. Before that, Jane Eyre. In fact, I think I could list to you all the books I’ve read that yanked me in and ate me up in the process of reading, and when I came out… I’m going to sound like Gandalf when I say “You may never return… and if you do, you will not be the same.” So Sang The Dawn is one of those books for me.

The prose is vivid, engaging, and nearly flawless in terms of pacing, plotlines, and flow. The story is sharp, harsh in places, and it hurts in all the right places. This brought me to tears so many times – actual curled-up-on-the-bed SOBBING. I read it in a week which is the fastest I’ve ever read something of this size. I stayed up late nights reading, which is also unusual for me. 

Aurora was entirely too relatable and I slid into her shoes so easily that it scared me. Raine reminds me of my own best friends and made me miss them dearly. I haven’t slid so completely into a story in a while and it took me a good two hours after I finished before I could even quite remember me. 

Okay. Let’s see if we can make some order out of my feelings on this book:

IT’S HUGE. I could win awards for the book yoga I pulled off to be able to read this comfortably. Eh, nah, I couldn’t. But anyway. Ever since AnnMarie published, I’ve been debating whether it would be as big as my cat. The answer (as evidenced on her Instagram @elli_and_indie) is that yes, it is pretty much just as big as my cat. TOTALLY WORTH IT TO HAVE THE PAPERBACK. In a lot of ways it needs to be that big. The story is so big that it needs every single one of its 723 pages. 

I loved it. I just totally and absolutely loved it. If I was beta reading, I would point out the three typos I found (and for the record 3 typos over 723 pages is totally insanely good.) That’s it. I can’t find anything that I feel needs to be changed except that I need the sequel RIGHT NOW PLEASE AND THANK YOU. 

The characters, the setting – I won’t give you spoilers, but THE WHOLE FREAKING SETTING IS AMAZING. Reading it in February, in the mountains of Western Maine, I knew exactly what she was talking about and I adored it. 

The story-telling has a beautiful blend of detail and action that is both poetic and made my heart race. 

This is a high fantasy story like few I’ve read and it has the added delight of a contemporary world and a high fantasy world blending flawlessly. 

It’s taken me three days to be able to think enough to be able to write a review and knowing me, it will be like three weeks before I can verbally talk about it. 

I apparently made a record by sending the author her first ever review in GIFs only. 

There is semi-graphic violence and heavy themes, but it’s all handled so well, so I recommend for 14+.






I highly recommend getting your copy from AnnMarie’s website – you can get it signed, and she does the most amazing wrapping and packaging job. Seriously, that got all the heart eyes from me. 




AnnMarie’s Website



Amazon Link




-Annie

Hey, on the side menu, there’s a newsletter sign-up option. If you want to hear from me about once a month with some special updates, go ahead and sign up! I look forward to talking more. Drop me a comment, or find my social medias and say hey!

Copyright 2018 by Annie Louise Twitchell. 

One Year Ago {this calls for celebration}

One year and one week ago I sat in the living room on a cold Saturday morning and read through the entity of KDP’s (Kindle Direct Publishing) terms of service. One year and one week ago I talked with my dad and decided on Annie Louise Twitchell as the name I would publish under. One year and one week ago today I opened a KDP account.

One year ago today I uploaded the cover file:

One year ago today I struggled over the acknowledgements, how to express what I felt and what I wanted to say. I’d never felt that something was so important. 
One year ago today I uploaded the finalized manuscript. 
One year from tomorrow, January 28th, my first book was published on Amazon Kindle. 
The Christmas Ladder is a little tiny story; it’s about 10 pages long. It’s a true story, mostly. It’s based on a story from my great-grandmother’s childhood. To celebrate my first book baby’s birthday, I’ve listed it for free on Amazon on the 27th, 28th, and 29th. 
It’s been a long year. It seems impossible that it’s been a whole year already, but at the same time I can’t believe it’s only been a year. I’m standing on the edge of 21, almost teetering, waited with bated breath. I don’t know what I’m waiting for. 
This past year has been full of pain and grief and anger and hurt and depression. It’s been full of anxiety and fear. It’s been full of hope and love and joy and the kind of laughter that explodes into a million glittering echoes because there’s nothing else for it to do. It’s been full of growth and change and healing. 
I’ve moved mountains, I think, at least for myself. 
I’m so thankful for this last year. 

-Annie

It’s Okay {my afternoon}

I’m in several young writer’s groups now, and I end up on the older end of the age range in most of them. I tend to mildly ‘big sister’ them, especially during a writing event month. I post reminders and encouragements and offer virtual hugs as needed. It’s something I’m pretty good at, and it’s useful for some of the members.

This week has been challenging for me, personally. It’s been hard and I’ve felt so worn out and tired. I had a panic attack (full blown panic attack, it was pretty bad) this morning when I realized I hadn’t written at all yesterday, and only a couple sentences the day before. I’m not doing any yearly writing challenges this year and I’ve actually met my January goals about a week ago, so I couldn’t figure out why I was panicking about it, but once my buddy got me calmed down and I was okay, I was able to sit down and do some journaling. That satisfied whatever it was that had prompted the panic attack. 
This evening, I was just feeling really discouraged and down. So I squished my anxiety about saying anything and asked in one of my writing groups for some encouraging quotes, memes, whatever. 
The response was pretty overwhelming and I was actually finally able to cry, which I hadn’t managed yet. After I had a good cry I felt so much better. I felt refreshed and clear-headed, I could think properly, my body was relaxed and didn’t feel like it was falling apart on me. 
It just really reminded me that no one here is an island and that it’s totally okay to need help and to ask for help. I often have this whisper in the back of my mind that says you don’t need to bother anyone with that and sometimes, I let it decide things for me. But tonight I didn’t, and I’m so very thankful that I didn’t. 
I feel ready for my day tomorrow and I’m looking forward to the handful of projects I have lined up. 
-Annie 
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Pick Up The Phone {three reasons why}

This week I had to file my sales tax return for my books.

A simple misunderstanding on the form resulted in a visit to the bank, three phone calls, an email, and talking with my dad for any ideas. The process took about seven hours spread over two days.

This morning I decided to get up my nerve and call the State office to talk to them about it.

The lady I spoke with was very kind and helpful. She didn’t make me feel stupid or silly, explained what was going on, and what I could do. She was patient and helpful, and when we were done, told me to have a good day. Having that mess sorted out so quickly and easily – I was on the phone with her for about five minutes – has gone a long way towards making my day better.

I don’t know about you, but I have issues with making phone calls. I’m better now about answering phone calls and calling my friends, but having to make a call to someone I don’t know stresses me out.

Especially if it’s something like this.

I’ve had my fair share of panicking over the telephone. I still do prefer to text than to talk, but that has more to do with my preference to write than to speak. I’m always afraid that I’ll mess up something important by saying the wrong words, or that I’ll start crying in the middle of a situation, or any number of self-induced disasters. If I can email instead of talk, I will take that route.

But here’s three reasons to pick up the phone and dial:

1 – connection

A voice over the phone is much more intimate than an email. It just is. You can convey more than you can in an email, just because there’s tone of voice and so on. A conversation goes much faster on the phone because you communicate in sentences instead of paragraphs.

2 – faster assistance

I sent an email to the State last night and I haven’t gotten a response yet. Normally I’d just wait, but since I need to have this filed posthaste, I didn’t have that luxury. Making the phone call got me someone to talk to right away. I didn’t even get put on hold this time, but when I have before, it’s still been faster than an email exchange.

3 – professionalism

Is that a word? I don’t know. If it isn’t, another phrase that would work is business skills. I answer phones in the morning at the computer shop my family owns. It’s made it so much easier for me to make these kinds of phone calls. I’ve learned to adjust my voice slightly so my words are distinct on the phone, to be concise, polite, and collected. I’ve learned to deal with irate customers on the phone, and even if they make me want to cry afterwards, I can conclude the conversation with them.

So yeah, I stress about important phone calls, and I make a mental script, and everything. But I’ve had enough practice that it’s starting to not be such a huge deal. Speaking on the phone is a skill, and a very good one to have.

Tips for having a successful phone call:

Make sure your environment isn’t making it harder for you. A clean desk, a pad of paper, a pen, and whatever references you need for the phone call will help you feel prepared, because well, you are.

Make sure your pen works. Seriously, this is huge. Before you make the phone call, test your pen and make sure it works.

Have a sip of water first. This will help your mouth not be too dry. If you get put on hold, take another sip. Don’t guzzle it down though! Needing a restroom stop isn’t going to help your nerves.

Write down the important things you need to talk about, or make a mental script. Some people might find it more helpful to have a list in front of them. I use my mental script as a way to focus myself on the call, so I don’t tend to write things down.

Remember that the person on the other end of the phone is a human too. They’re probably not that concerned if you stumble over your words a bit, or if you’re nervous and uncomfortable. They talk to people on the phone a lot and you’re not going to be that memorable.

Be polite. Saying thank you very much at the end of the call will make you feel better, make the person you spoke with feel better, and generally make the whole thing end of a happy note. Guess what? That really helps with the next time.

It is okay to get someone to help you if you really need it. I had my mother call to make the appointment for my wisdom teeth extraction last month, because I was too stressed and upset about the whole thing. I was pretty sure I’d start crying if I got on the phone. She offered to help me call about my taxes today, but I got it taken care on my own. Stretching yourself is good, but you’re not trying to break. If you pull a rubber band too far, it snaps. That’s not the goal here. If you really can’t make the phone call, that’s okay.

-Annie

copyright 2018 by Annie Louise Twitchell
Image from Pixabay

No Dragons, Please! {updated Kindle edition}

No Dragons, Please! wasn’t originally intended to be published as a Kindle e-book, due to the illustrations and the formatting difficulties they present. I found Amazon has a program for building children’s books for Kindle, so I used that. Basically what it does is lock everything on a page as if it’s an actual book page, which messes up with changing the font size, zooming in and out, and other issues. All my checks on my devices showed that it came out okay – not stellar, but it was readable for me, so I called it good.

When I found out today that it wasn’t working out for some readers, due to the formatting and how it was locked in, I went back and updated it. It now reads like a normal Kindle book, where you can change the font size as needed. The images aren’t 100% centered and I haven’t been able to find out why, but they are still in there and not looking too bad, if I do say so myself.

There aren’t any changes to the content of the book other than the formatting and one illustration that I moved to flow better in the story, so if you were able to read it just fine on your device before, you don’t need to update it. If you had issues, you may want to update the book, and here’s a link to How-To Geek that explains how to do that: How-To Geek: How to Get the Latest Version of Your Kindle Books (Including Ours)

I’m so sorry if this caused any inconvenience to my readers! As an apology/thank you, I’m going to be putting No Dragons, Please! for free on Kindle on January 7th and 8th. Here’s the Amazon link: No Dragons, Please!

As a side note, the internet at my house is out right now, so I have limited access to social media. I’m running a mobile hotspot on my phone to post this blog update. If you feel inclined to share this post, could you do that? Thanks ever so much.

-Annie